Preparing for the Parps

10 Aug

I’ve used the term “roller coaster” several times to describe my bumpy  pancreatic cancer fight. A couple of days ago, two of my daughters danced into my room while I was resting , delighted with news they couldn’t wait to share: “Positive progress on the Parps. Abbott Laboratories[1] are starting Phase 2 trials – and it seems that you’ll be getting their drug”. Good news indeed.

Bad news is absolute – but this news left me stunned. For so long Pam has talked about the Parps as being the “game changer” while I’ve tried to temper her enthusiasm with what she saw as cynicism. I found the good news hard to digest. The concept of stopping chemotherapy for something better – that has “no side effects” – is too much to process. The belief that a cure will come keeps me going – yet just as it seems that we’re one step closer, I still can find no reason to celebrate. Inexplicable.

To think that Abbott is a corporation that grossed nearly US$ 40 billion last year – about a sixth of Israel’s total gross domestic product. That Abbott spent more than US$ 4 billion on research in 2011 – almost as much as Israel’s entire Ministry of Health budget. But it has brought them to Phase 2 trials of their drug Veliparib[2].

Veliparib, or ABT-888, is an orally active poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase potent inhibitor of both PARP-1 and PARP-2 that potentiates DNA-damaging agents in preclinical tumors. In the MX-1 breast model (BRCA1 deletion and BRCA2 mutation), it causes regression of established tumors, whereas with comparable doses of cytotoxic agents alone, only modest tumor inhibition was exhibited. Veliparib has been around since 2008 when trials first started for metastatic or unresectable solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Abbott’s trial version is specifically directed at pancreatic cancer suffers with the BRCA2 mutation.

I’m certainly no scientist, nor do I profess to have a working knowledge of these drugs. But I can recommend any and everyone that has pancreatic cancer to test whether they are a BRCA2 carrier. If so, contact Memorial Sloane Kettering, who are running the trials, (or Tel Hashomer Hospital, if you’re in Israel or your national oncology facility).

I was sitting outside my oncologist’s waiting room on Wednesday, waiting to hear more details of her breaking news the day before. Inevitably I flipped through my phone’s inbox to find an e-mail blinking. To be a messanger of bad news is not easy. A pancreatic cancer sufferer I tried to help had passed away. I couldn’t hold back the tears.

I’ve looked back to see if I mentioned him in a previous blog. On 20th May, 2012, I made a reference to him. He was my source of the trial I referred to in that blog. And here I was waiting for news of another trial.

I looked myself in the mirror this morning and seemed to perceive that my hair has slightly grown back. Is it just longer or is it the result of stopping Abraxane? I can’t wait to find out. 

 


 

[1]   Abbott’s website is worth a visit. Click on  www.abbott.com

[2]  I haven’t found any information through Abbott Laboratories but can direct you to  www.inhibitor2.com for more information.

 

Advertisements

4 Responses to “Preparing for the Parps”

  1. ahirshberg@pancreatic.org August 10, 2012 at 3:44 pm #

    Congratulations Martin! It was a long fight to get the Parp…so here we go! Love, agi
    Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

  2. Felicity August 10, 2012 at 5:01 pm #

    Your fortitude is completely inspiring to all of us fans!!

  3. Estelle August 14, 2012 at 9:03 am #

    I follow your blog closely although I haven’t commented until now. Your fortitude is indeed inspiring and I too am a huge (if generally silent) fan.

  4. angiemaus August 18, 2012 at 7:01 am #

    At last the news Pam’s been fighting for. Let us know the minute it arrives with your name on the prescription! Love you xxx

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: